Best Sunglasses for Cricket in 2021 – Tested and Reviewed

More and more players are using sunglasses out in the field and, because there are so many brands to choose from, it’s time to review the best.

What Kind of Sunglasses are Best for Cricket?

The best cricket sunglasses will offer complete protection against the sun and its potentially harmful UV rays. While out in the field for hours at a time, cricketers can be vulnerable to those effects and there can be long term health problems such as cataracts and even cancer. Of course, those sunglasses also need to be comfortable and unobtrusive.

Best Cricket Sunglasses

Oakley Radar EV Path Sunglasses

Oakley is a very popular brand and you will often see the professional players wearing their sunglasses. I’ve tried quite a few out on the field and I’d have to say that these – the Radar EV Path – are my personal favourites.

They are at the top priced end of the range but they are exceptionally strong and hard wearing so you should get plenty of use out of them. They are also stylish and come in a range of standard lens colours but you can actually personalise them for your own use.

Having not really tried Oakley before, I was surprised to find how lightweight they were. Many users talk about the comfort and that’s a definite plus with these. The straight arms also aid this comfort while the polarised lenses should give you all the UV protection that you need.

Also worn by Virat Kohli and Joe Root.

Oakley-Radar-EV-Path-Sunglasses

RAYZOR Ventz Yellow Light Enhancing Glasses

Sunglasses can also help in the field with some products enhancing the light and making it easier to see the ball. If that’s a big requirement then I’d recommend giving these RAYZOR glasses a try.

They are a bit of a combination because they offer the protections against direct sunlight but they can also enhance visibility in low light situations.

The price range is lower here but they are also extremely stylish and you’ll definitely stand out with a pair of these on. The comfort levels are also high with the RAYZOR Ventz being flexible and designed to fit around the shape of your head.

Oakley M2 Frame XL Sunglasses

This is another product from the respected Oakley catalogue and, once again, they are towards the top end of the price range. There are similarities to the first product on this list because the lenses can come in different colours but there is also a standard and very stylish plain black lens.

Note that the M2 are not polarised but there is a UV protection coating included so there should be no issues with keeping that sun at bay. A lot of users say that they are also hard wearing so, while there is a higher price involved, you should find that you don’t have to replace them for a few years if you look after them properly.

Relatively speaking, these glasses are quite large so they may be a little loose if you have a smaller head. Like all of these products, make sure to check the measurements, especially if you’re purchasing online and not able to try them on.

Oakley-M2-Frame-XL-Sunglasses

Gray Nicolls Cricket Sunglasses

I personally have been using Gray Nicolls equipment for a while and there are reasons why myself and others do the same. Firstly, they are a respected name who specialise in cricket equipment so their products will be specifically for the sport. Some of the sunglasses on this list could also be used for cycling, for example, but I wouldn’t suggest using these away from the cricket pitch.

They are also a basic, no fuss product and they are very reasonably priced. While they are quite stylish, they don’t stand out too much and that’s especially important for me. If you drop a dolly catch, you look a bit foolish but in bright coloured sunglasses you look even more ridiculous.

That’s why I really like the Gray Nicolls Cricket Sunglasses. They are comfortable, affordable and they protect your eyes and that’s all I’m really looking for.

Adidas Adivista Cricket Sunglasses

I’ve covered Adidas quite extensively in other product reviews. They are a long-established sports brand and they’ve been making some of the best cricket equipment for some time. It may also be fair to say that they’ve done more testing than most brands after an extensive set of trials in the glaring sun of India back in 2008.

As a result, many users find that their products are great at reducing eye fatigue and these Adidas Adivista sunglasses are a good example of that. There are interchangeable lenses for various levels of brightness while a snap bridge across the nose can be adjusted for comfort.

If you have an optical prescription, they will even make a clip in lens to match it which is an excellent addition to the service that Adidas provide. It’s worth mentioning that it’s easy to change the lens and it won’t be too time consuming.

Adidas-Adivista-Cricket-Sunglasses

Omtex Prime Outdoor Sports Sunglasses

The rainbow lenses on the Omtex Prime will really make you stand out on the field so perhaps you should start practising your catching. They are made from strong polycarbonate and one size fits all but they are widely praised for their comfort. I tried them on and, while I haven’t actually used them in a match situation, I was impressed by how natural they felt on my head.

They are not polarised but there are high levels of protection and users often comment on the durability. The price needs to be considered but this is another product that you shouldn’t have to replace regularly – as long as you take proper care of them.

Fastrack UV Protected Sport Sunglasses

These are stylish glasses that have a fairly plain design so they are similar to the Gray Nicolls product in that respect. They also carry a mid range price so this could be a good option for the club cricketer who only plays once a weekend.

They are fairly basic but look tough and durable and there is that level of comfort to add in. The Fastrack brand is not polarised but it has that strong UV protection that is promised in the title.

Fastrack-UV-Protected-Sport-Sunglasses

DSC Passion Polarized Cricket Sunglasses

I was impressed by the DSC range of bats which were covered in a previous review so I was keen to expand the range and try on these glasses. As the name tells you, the DSC Passion pair is polarised so you can expect to pay a little bit more but they’re a good choice for the serious cricketer.

They are very stylish and, visually, they are unlike any other pair of sunglasses in this round up. That unique design is intended to provide greater all-round protection and they do this as they wrap around your face. I was particularly impressed with how lightweight they were but reviews suggest that they are durable so you shouldn’t need to replace them too often.

SS Prime Cricket Sunglasses

These SS sunglasses also have rainbow lenses but they are more subtle so you won’t stand out quite as much on the field. Price wise, they are at the cheaper end of the scale with numbers similar to those of the Gray Nicolls pair.

You can add either a white or a black frame depending on your preference and this will also come with a hard carry case. There is no polarization but there is full UV covering and they wrap around to provide full protection to the eye area.

This is another pair that surprised me in terms of their weight. Because they are much cheaper than many glasses on this list, I was expecting them to be a bit cumbersome but this wasn’t the case. Obviously we won’t know how durable they are just yet but reviews suggest that they are resistant to heavy use.

They were extremely comfortable for me too so I picked some up as a spare for next season.

SS-Prime-Cricket-Sunglasses

Cricket Sunglasses FAQ

Why do Cricket Players Wear Sunglasses?

A red cricket ball can be hard to pick up on a bright sunny day. It’s even worse if the sun is in your eyes and that’s why most cricketers wear sunglasses. Helping visibility is a big plus and that’s probably the first requirement for many.

More players are starting to think about the health aspects. Along with hats and plenty of sunblock, a quality pair of sunglasses can provide that protection which should be an essential part of any cricketer’s equipment.